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Rhythm Rap (Original)

This is a rap verse I wrote to show what some commonly used rhythms look like in context. I go from quarter notes up to 32nd notes and back down over a dancehall inspired beat by Tenderly Music.

LYRICS

Quart er notes are so ea-sy You put one note on ev-ery beat

Next is eighth notes just like that we split the quart er note in half I Put two notes in every beat but oh just wait till we get fast.

Next is the Triplet some people say tri-pa-let put-in three notes in a beat just like this. I’m gonna Put my accents into groups of two but change it back and the triplet still hits.

Now we finna Get into a duple again and we comin through ya sixteenths are what I be doin countin 1 e and a 2 e and a chop it up how Ever you Like it I’m Tellin you Don’t try to Fight it, cause this is a rhythm you gotta know.

Rappin a tripalet like I’m the Migos, accurate like it be measured in Kilos Comin and showin the people you killin the subdivision like somebody messed with Al Pachino Doin sixtuplets I’m takin a trip-a-let hit’n em double speed and you might wanna go ahead and buckle up cause of the thirty-second notes so ok now here we go.

Say you wanna hear another rhythm I can do it every day and you can see me at the pinnacle I will never lose you know I gotta be the one to take it all over the world I’m always gonna be the champion. Like the sun I shine for fun and Im gonna kill it every day until the day is done I work on my music don’t guess it I choose it I work things out, got a lot of clout This right here is what I am all about, elevated from the floor up Now I taught you something I’mma go get me a donut.

Go read some music I bet you this shows up like BAD MAN FORWARD BAD MAN PULL UP!

Hot Club Cover of “Hot Stuff”

bhamjazz.com (Birmingham Institute of Jazz) presents a Hot Club arrangement of “Hot Stuff” by Donna Summer for violin, bass, accordion, and guitar (lead and rhythm). Arrangement by Leah Pogwizd.

Original version of “Hot Stuff” by Donna Summer.

“Bohemia After Dark” (basis for guitar solo).

“Bohemia After Dark” (basis for guitar solo).

“C Blues” (Annotated Bassline)

Bassline construction is a crucial first step in learning jazz tunes and improvisation. Annotated Bassline is a series designed to help players of all instruments build this skill.

Today, we’re looking at a 12-bar blues in the key of ‘C’. Note that some C Blues (such as Duke Ellington’s “C-Jam Blues“) are more simple, just using three chords (C7, F7, and G7). Others, like Charlie Parker’s “Relaxin at Camarillo,” use more complex chord substitutions (like F7-F#dim7, etc.)

Note that the circled numbers are bar numbers, while the plain numbers are chord-scale degrees (C is the ‘1’ of C7, etc…) Red circles mean the line moves up the scale, while blue ones mean the line moves down the scale.

Bar 1 is moving from C to F (I to IV, or up a perfect fourth) and uses a 1-2-3-5 pattern. This pattern is useful when moving from I-IV or I-VI.

Bar 2 is moving from F to C (IV to I, or up a perfect fifth/down a perfect fourth) and uses a 1-1-b7-6 pattern. This pattern is useful when moving from IV-I, I-V, etc.

Bar 3 is moving from C to C (I to I, or a perfect unison) and uses a 1-2-3-2 pattern. This pattern is useful when staying on the same root for multiple bars.

Bar 4 is moving from C to F and uses the same 1-2-3-5 pattern as Bar 1.

Bar 5 is moving from F to F and uses the same 1-2-3-2 pattern as Bar 3.

Bar 6 is moving from F to C and uses the same 1-1-b7-6 pattern as Bar 2.

Bar 7 is moving from C to C and uses the same 1-2-3-2 pattern as Bar 3.

Bar 8 is moving from C to D (I to ii, or up a major second) and uses a 1-2-3-1 pattern. This pattern is useful when moving from I-ii, V-vi, etc.

Bar 9 is moving from D to G and uses the same 1-2-3-5 pattern as Bars 1 and 4, but here is 1-2-b3-5 to account for the Dmin7 chord.

Bar 10 is moving from G to C and uses the same 1-2-3-5 pattern as Bars 1, 4, and 9. Notice the octave displacement (‘5’ moves down a major sixth – rather than up a minor third – to the low ‘D’).

Bar 11 is moving from C to G (I to V, or up a perfect fifth) and uses a 1-2-3-4 pattern. This pattern is useful when moving from I-V.

Bar 12 is moving from G to C (V to I, or up a perfect fourth) and uses a 1-b7-6-5 pattern. This pattern is useful when moving from V-I, I-IV, etc.


Questions? Leave them in the comments. Wanna learn more about bass playing or bassline construction? See here for information on lessons with me. Thanks for reading!